A message from Anonymous
what do you think are the common aspects of all turkic cultures?

Language is definitely the first, especially the more basic components of our languages like numbers or pronouns. There is also religion, food, common behaviors (kind of like the way we interact among ourselves, I’m not sure how to explain it but I can see the similarities), how we greet others, respect for elders and strong family bonds. Nomadic lifestyles are also a common aspect but more for Central Asian turks rather than the ones more in the west like Turkey. They used to follow shamanism before converting to Islam a long time ago. Some turks still practice shamanism today. I also think that depending on geographic location, Turkic people are culturally closer. For example, it seems the northern Siberian turks have more in common with each other while turks more in the west like Turkey and Azerbaijan have more in common. I hope this answered your question! I kept it general because if I went into detail it would be super long lol. 

Edit: I would also like to add: Carpets! Turkic people are very into carpets. Our people hand weave and use traditional carpets a lot. Turkic carpets can be distinguished from other cultures’ carpets (like Persian) based on the knots and designs (ours seem to use geometric shapes more). 

urungu:

OTTOMAN YOUTHS 

urungu:

OTTOMAN YOUTHS 

uyghurislam:

Beautiful minaret in Kashgar ,Xinjiang

uyghurislam:

Beautiful minaret in Kashgar ,Xinjiang

TULPAN (2008)

Asa, a recently discharged Russian Navy sailor, is living in the remote Kazakhstan steppe with his sister Samal, her older husband, Ondas, and their three children. He dreams of becoming a herdsman with his own ranch, but needs to be married before he will be able to fulfil his dream. Asa hopes to marry Tulpan, the daughter of a neighboring family and the only woman eligible for marriage perhaps within a hundred miles. However, her parents are unwilling to see their daughter married off to an unemployed man with few prospects and Tulpan herself appears to have little interest in Asa. The plot of the story follows the trials of Asa, his surrogate family, and his western culture-loving friend Boni.

TULPAN (2008)

Asa, a recently discharged Russian Navy sailor, is living in the remote Kazakhstan steppe with his sister Samal, her older husband, Ondas, and their three children. He dreams of becoming a herdsman with his own ranch, but needs to be married before he will be able to fulfil his dream. Asa hopes to marry Tulpan, the daughter of a neighboring family and the only woman eligible for marriage perhaps within a hundred miles. However, her parents are unwilling to see their daughter married off to an unemployed man with few prospects and Tulpan herself appears to have little interest in Asa. The plot of the story follows the trials of Asa, his surrogate family, and his western culture-loving friend Boni.

fotoblogturkey:

İstanbul, Türkiye, Turkey

fotoblogturkey:

İstanbul, Türkiye, Turkey

everythingcentralasia:

The Savitsky Karakalpakstan Art Museum at Nukus, Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan

Opened in 1966, the museum houses a collection of over 82,000 items, ranging from antiquities from Khorezm to Karakalpak folk art, Uzbek fine art and, uniquely, the second largest collection of Russian avant-garde in the world (after the Russian Museum in St. Petersburg).

Igor Savitsky (Russian painter, archeologist and collector) single-handedly created the museum. He began his collection with traditional clothing, jewellery, carpets and textiles created by the Karakalpak people in the region, and moved on to collect the works of indigenous artists as well as the underground art of the Uzbekistan school, which melded Asian influences with European expressionism. Ultimately he would make six 1,700-mile trips to and from Moscow to rescue the avant-garde work of Russian painters. Moreover, refuting the Socialist Realism school, the collection shook the foundations of that period of art history. It was not until perestroika in 1985—the year after he died—that Savitsky’s remarkable achievements and collections were truly acknowledged, and not until 1991—when Uzbekistan became independent—that Nukus, a remote ‘closed’ city during the Soviet Union, became accessible to the outside world. (x) (x) (x)

westeastsouthnorth:

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

westeastsouthnorth:

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

chingizhobbes:

Tashkent, Uzbek SSR, 1970s. Photos by Н.И.Кузьмина.

ethnoworld:

Gold embroidered suit, 19th century.Turkey

ethnoworld:

Gold embroidered suit, 19th century.Turkey

chingizhobbes:

"Usbek," 1845-47, German engraving. At this time, the term "Uzbek" would have referred specifically to the ruling class in central Turkestan which was descended from an offshoot of the same nomadic group as the still-nomadic (at the time) Kazakhs. Hence the fancy digs.

chingizhobbes:

"Usbek," 1845-47, German engraving. At this time, the term "Uzbek" would have referred specifically to the ruling class in central Turkestan which was descended from an offshoot of the same nomadic group as the still-nomadic (at the time) Kazakhs. Hence the fancy digs.


A revealing photo, taken circa 1900 in Central Asia. We see a Tekke Turkmen family seated in their yurt, posing for the photographer. Behind are some classic weavings, all contemporary with the period. The applique textiles are quite nice as well. The ethereal quality of the images is accentuated by the glare of sunlight shining through the opening at the top of the yurt.

A revealing photo, taken circa 1900 in Central Asia. We see a Tekke Turkmen family seated in their yurt, posing for the photographer. Behind are some classic weavings, all contemporary with the period. The applique textiles are quite nice as well. The ethereal quality of the images is accentuated by the glare of sunlight shining through the opening at the top of the yurt.

A message from Anonymous
I don't mean to offend anyone, but why don't some Turkic people look "Asian"? I am of Turkic descent, but do not appear to look "Asian", which is why I ask.

Turkic people are spread out through Asia because they either moved due to their nomadic lifestyle or conquered other lands/areas, so there was some intermixing and intermarriages between local populations they came across. For example, Turkic people came in contact with a lot of other native populations in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and the Middle East, hence why there’s so many varying features among us.