A message from Anonymous
Do you know Turkish?

Yes :)

A Kyrgyz girl playing the stringed instrument called “Komuz.” Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.
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A Kyrgyz girl playing the stringed instrument called “Komuz.” Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.

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plasmatics-life:

Magic Istanbul [via/more] By Bernd Zimmermann

plasmatics-life:

Magic Istanbul [via/more] By Bernd Zimmermann

everythingcentralasia:

Paintings by an Uzbek artist, Saira Keltaeva.

Saira Keltaeva was born on 16 May 1961 in Kumyshkan, Tashkent region, Uzbek SSR. In 1979 Saira Keltaeva graduated from the National Music Art School, boarding arts class on easel painting, she was taught under the guidance of Art teacher A.P.Perova - national artist of Uzbekistan. The same year she entered Theatre and Art Institute in Tashkent. Saira Keltaeva is a member of the Creative Union of Artists at the Academy of Arts of Uzbekistan. Saira’s works are exhibited in museums and Art Galleries, as well as in private collections in Korea, China, Turkey, Germany, Holland, Italy, France and the United States.

everythingcentralasia:

One Turkmen Kitchen is a must-visit blog for foodies. A native of Turkmenistan now living in Prague uses the blog to share recipes from the Turkmen cuisine.


A group of Khakas at Minusinsk.

A group of Khakas at Minusinsk.

breathtakingdestinations:

Gur-e Amir - Samarkand - Uzbekistan (von khowaga1)

breathtakingdestinations:

Gur-e Amir - Samarkand - Uzbekistan (von khowaga1)

everythingcentralasia:

Uyghur musical instruments, Kashgar

everythingcentralasia:

Uyghur musical instruments, Kashgar

A message from Anonymous
what do you think are the common aspects of all turkic cultures?

Language is definitely the first, especially the more basic components of our languages like numbers or pronouns. There is also religion, food, common behaviors (kind of like the way we interact among ourselves, I’m not sure how to explain it but I can see the similarities), how we greet others, respect for elders and strong family bonds. Nomadic lifestyles are also a common aspect but more for Central Asian turks rather than the ones more in the west like Turkey. They used to follow shamanism before converting to Islam a long time ago. Some turks still practice shamanism today. I also think that depending on geographic location, Turkic people are culturally closer. For example, it seems the northern Siberian turks have more in common with each other while turks more in the west like Turkey and Azerbaijan have more in common. I hope this answered your question! I kept it general because if I went into detail it would be super long lol. 

Edit: I would also like to add: Carpets! Turkic people are very into carpets. Our people hand weave and use traditional carpets a lot. Turkic carpets can be distinguished from other cultures’ carpets (like Persian) based on the knots and designs (ours seem to use geometric shapes more). 

urungu:

OTTOMAN YOUTHS 

urungu:

OTTOMAN YOUTHS 

uyghurislam:

Beautiful minaret in Kashgar ,Xinjiang

uyghurislam:

Beautiful minaret in Kashgar ,Xinjiang

TULPAN (2008)

Asa, a recently discharged Russian Navy sailor, is living in the remote Kazakhstan steppe with his sister Samal, her older husband, Ondas, and their three children. He dreams of becoming a herdsman with his own ranch, but needs to be married before he will be able to fulfil his dream. Asa hopes to marry Tulpan, the daughter of a neighboring family and the only woman eligible for marriage perhaps within a hundred miles. However, her parents are unwilling to see their daughter married off to an unemployed man with few prospects and Tulpan herself appears to have little interest in Asa. The plot of the story follows the trials of Asa, his surrogate family, and his western culture-loving friend Boni.

TULPAN (2008)

Asa, a recently discharged Russian Navy sailor, is living in the remote Kazakhstan steppe with his sister Samal, her older husband, Ondas, and their three children. He dreams of becoming a herdsman with his own ranch, but needs to be married before he will be able to fulfil his dream. Asa hopes to marry Tulpan, the daughter of a neighboring family and the only woman eligible for marriage perhaps within a hundred miles. However, her parents are unwilling to see their daughter married off to an unemployed man with few prospects and Tulpan herself appears to have little interest in Asa. The plot of the story follows the trials of Asa, his surrogate family, and his western culture-loving friend Boni.